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What’s the difference between collagen peptides and hydrolyzed collagen?

Collagen Peptides or Hydrolyzed collagen? In this article we clarify the two names and get to the root of where they come from and what they mean. There is no difference. The terms collagen peptides and hydrolyzed collagen are synonymous and used interchangeably for the same product. It’s just a matter of semantics. The phrase ‘collagen peptides’ is based on the end product, which are peptides derived from collagen; whereas ‘hydrolyzed collagen’ comes from the hydrolyzation process, the method by which collagen peptides are made. For a simple illustration, consider the ingredient ‘wheat flour’. You can call it ‘ground wheat’, after the grinding process. Or ‘wheat flour’ after the end product i.e. flour. So hydrolyzed collagen is just another way of saying collagen peptides. Hydrolyzed Collagen vs Collagen Peptides:...

The Bioavailability of Collagen Peptides

Collagen peptides are derived from pure collagen. Collagen peptides are a functional ingredient used in food and beverages as well as dietary supplements, targeting both bone and joint health along with skin beauty. Furthermore, collagen peptides help speeding up the recovery process for sports enthusiasts and professional athletes alike. Scientific data show that, when used as a dietary supplement, collagen peptides have the ability to stimulate both cell regeneration and growth in the human body. The idea on the biological mechanisms underlying these health benefits continues to take form. In this article, we’re going to look at two pivotal attributes of collagen peptides, directly linked to their health benefits: bioavailability and bioactivity.   What is bioavailability?  The nutrients in our food are broken down into smaller molecules first in...

What is sports recovery, why is it important and how can collagen peptides help?

With recreational sports and fitness activity on the increase, this article takes a look at the importance of sports recovery and how an ever growing population of active people can benefit from the ‘recovery principle’. We also look at the best ways to optimize recovery, including some exciting news about collagen peptides.    The world population is getting more active. In recent years there has been a boom in recreational sport and athletics, with millions of people taking up their favorite activity either at an amateur level or simply as a hobby.    Though not everyone is doing it for the same reasons. The part-time sports enthusiasts and non-professional bodybuilders want to achieve their performance goals, so they’re taking inspiration from the professionals and pushing themselves further with more intensive...

Couple performing yoga

Type II collagen for joint health: who is it for

Joint health isn’t just a concern for older people. Many younger people are also taking an interest in their long-term joint health. In this article we look at the three main consumer groups for whom joint conditions are a big issue. Then we take a look at how the emergence of type II collagen can help them solve their problems. Joint conditions are usually associated with the ageing population. However, many younger people are also concerned about their joint health. The two main groups in this younger category are sportspeople and overweight people. Nowadays, over-the-counter supplements - which tend to be a natural, safer alternative to long-term pain medication - are the common approach to supporting joint health. Up until recently the go-to supplements have been glucosamine and...

Porcine collagen based dish

Rediscovering porcine collagen

Pork is a relatively overlooked source of collagen peptides. Yet it’s been part of our diets for many thousands of years. So in this article we’re going to look at what porcine collagen is, its history and why it’s currently making a comeback in the Western world.   What is collagen? Collagen is a protein that can be found in all animals, including humans. It’s basically the glue that holds everything together and gives structure to the body. The highest concentrations of collagen are found in connective tissues, bones and skin. This type of unprocessed collagen is commonly known as ‘native collagen’.   Native collagen vs collagen peptides Native collagen is hard to digest. So, for it to have nutritional value, native collagen needs to be processed into collagen peptides for bioavailability....